2009/13 Flash flood: Taiwan, China

Million Chinese flee typhoon Morakot
• China evacuates south-east coast areas as typhoon hits
• Boy dies in Wenzhou; three dead, 31 missing in Taiwan
By Sam Jones and agencies
The Guardian, Sunday 9 August 2009 15.50 BST

A collapsed hotel building after typhoon Morakot hit Taitung county, eastern Taiwan. Photograph: Reuters

A collapsed hotel building after typhoon Morakot hit Taitung county, eastern Taiwan. Photograph: Reuters

 

Youtube video uploaded by fonwar. Uploaded on Aug 12, 2009
Taiwan Hotel Falls down in the River cause of the Typhoon Morakot flo

Hotel building collapse ! After Typhoon Morakot hit southern Taiwan, this hotel had been collapse ! It’s in very famous spring area Chihpen. It stands away from river about 300 meters, but the riverside park had been destroyed by sever water, and 8 more store building collapsed, then this hotel.

Almost 1 million people were evacuated from China’s south-eastern coast as typhoon Morakot swept across to the mainland from Taiwan today, bringing torrential rain and huge waves.

Three people were killed and 31 were missing, feared dead, in southern Taiwan, where the typhoon caused the worst flooding in 50 years.

Morakot made landfall on Xiapu, a county in eastern China’s Fujian province, with winds of up to 74mph, according to an official at the China Meteorological Administration.

 Chinese authorities evacuated more than 490,000 people in Zhejiang province and 480,000 others in neighboring Fujian province. A child was killed and houses flattened when Morakot hit Wenzhou, a manufacturing hub on the coast of Zhejiang province.

“Four adults and a four-year-old boy were buried in debris and the child died during the afternoon after emergency treatment failed,” the official Xinhua news agency reported.

While mainland authorities have become practiced in preparing for the typhoon season, the chaotic weather can disrupt business, fishing and shipping across the export-driven region.

Authorities in Fujian called 48,000 boats back to harbor, and in the provincial capital, Fuzhou, people were rushing to supermarkets for necessities before the typhoon arrived, according to Xinhua. In Zhejiang, around 35,440 ships were called back from sea.

Flights from Fuzhou and Xiamen were cancelled. At least one cargo ship was stranded after the strong winds and waves pushed it into shallow waters.

Further up the coast, Shanghai was on “high alert” and dozens of cargo ships in the area delayed or cancelled voyages, with forecasters warning of torrential downpours and waves at sea up to seven metres or higher, Xinhua said.

Morakot hit Taiwan late on Friday, tearing across the island yesterday and dumping more than 200cm (80 inches) of rain on some southern counties.

 Taiwan’s Disaster Relief Centre said a woman was killed when her vehicle plunged into a ditch in Kaohsiung county in heavy rain on Friday, and two men drowned in Pingtung and Tainan respectively. It said 31 people were missing and feared dead.

 It said flash flooding had washed away a makeshift home in southern Kaohsiung, leaving 16 people missing. Three were swept away in south-eastern Taitung county, including two policemen who were helping to evacuate villagers. Twelve others were missing, including three fishermen from a capsized boat and three people whose cars fell into a rain-swollen river, it said.

 In southern Pingtung county, 4,000 people were stranded in inundated villages waiting for police boats to rescue them, news media reported. In Taitung, a six-story hotel collapsed and plunged into a river after floodwater eroded its base. All 300 people in the hotel were evacuated and uninjured, officials said.

 In the northern Philippines, the typhoon and lingering monsoon rains left 21 people dead and seven others missing in landslides and floodwater, including three European tourists who were swept away on Thursday, the National Disaster Coordinating Council said. The bodies of a Belgian and two French citizens were found on Friday.

 More than 83,000 people in 93 northern villages were affected by floods and landslides, including 22,200 who fled their homes, the council said.

 Rescue helicopters and ships were still searching for about 10 Chinese crew whose ships were caught in tropical storm Goni, which made landfall in Guangdong on Wednesday and swept the coastal areas of Hainan on Thursday and Friday, before weakening to a tropical depression.

Typhoons regularly hit China, Taiwan, the Philippines and Japan in the second half of the year, gathering strength from the warm waters of the Pacific Ocean or South China Sea before weakening over land. Most casualties tend to be in mountainous regions prone to landslides and flash floods.

East China braces for incoming typhoon Morakot; 10 still missing
www.chinaview.cn
2009-08-09 00:54:17

Affected by typhoon "Morakot", strong tides surge on the Qiantang River in Haining, a city of east China's Zhejiang Province, Aug. 8, 2009. ((Xinhua Photo)

Affected by typhoon “Morakot”, strong tides surge on the Qiantang River in Haining, a city of east China’s Zhejiang Province, Aug. 8, 2009. ((Xinhua Photo)

Although the typhoon this year is expected to weaken to a tropical storm before it arrives in the Chinese mainland, it was packing winds of 137 kilometers an hour at 7 a.m. Saturday and churning northwestwards at a speed of 15 to 20 kilometers an hour.

It has already unleashed torrential rain in Fujian where, at five sites, water levels have been recorded at 0.02 to 0.66 meters above warning levels.

Affected by typhoon "Morakot", strong tides surge on the Qiantang River in Haining, a city of east China's Zhejiang Province, Aug. 8, 2009. ((Xinhua Photo)

Affected by typhoon “Morakot”, strong tides surge on the Qiantang River in Haining, a city of east China’s Zhejiang Province, Aug. 8, 2009. ((Xinhua Photo)

 

The earlier tropical storm Goni has also wreaked havoc in South China Sea, leaving as many as 156 fishermen and crew members from Cambodia, Vietnam and China missing at once.

Chinese maritime authorities had rescued 146 by 6 p.m. and the remaining 10 from China were still missing.

PREPARATION IN FUJIAN

More than 480,000 people in Fujian have been evacuated and its Zherong County received more than 300 mm of precipitation on Saturday afternoon.

In Luoyuan county of Fuzhou city, Fujian’s capital, people stayed at home during the weekend and roads were almost empty. Fewer sellers appeared in the county’s vegetable market.

Fishing boats moor at a port to avoid the approaching Typhoon Morakot in Jinjiang, southeast China's Fujian Province, Aug. 8, 2009. (Xinhua/Xiang Kailai)

Fishing boats moor at a port to avoid the approaching Typhoon Morakot in Jinjiang, southeast China’s Fujian Province, Aug. 8, 2009. (Xinhua/Xiang Kailai)

“The fields were flooded,” said Li Sailian, a vegetable seller.

“Strong winds broke the ropes tying down the horsebeans, and the crown daisies (chrysanthemum greens) were destroyed,” she said.

Li brought all her available stock to the market, fearing the storm would destroy it completely. In downtown Fuzhou, where several big trees have already been toppled by gale-force winds, people were rushing to supermarkets for necessities before the typhoon arrived.

All flights from Saturday noon onwards at the airport in Fuzhou were cancelled, leaving more than 120 passengers stranded. Airport staff were helping with refunds. Seventeen of the 312 flights to and from the airport in coastal Xiamen city were cancelled, most of which were heading to Anhui, Guangdong and Taiwan.

In Putian City, also in Fujian, all scenic sites and ports have been closed and school classes suspended. A team of 26,222 people has been formed and equipped with flood-control materials, said Huang Dongzhou, director of the city’s flood control office.

All of the city’s 7,168 fishing ships have returned to harbor, Huang said.

The province’s Ningde city is strengthening its defences to bear the brunt of Morakot, local meteorological authorities said.

People there are also reinforcing reservoirs with bricks and stones. Water in the city’s 20 major reservoirs is only at 54 percent of their combined capacity, so officials with the flood control office said they think the rainfall will help with drought relief, as long as proper measures are taken to ensure safety.

 Residents are also busy reinforcing their own houses. Chen Kongsheng, a 61-year-old man, has attached four large rocks to the girders of his house, so that the typhoon “won’t tear off his roof”.

About 118,000 people in the city have been evacuated, said Chen Rongkai, Communist Party chief of the city. Ningde has readied 103 rescue boats, 15 rafts and 8,300 life jackets to help people affected by the typhoon.

 EFFORTS AND TROUBLES ELSEWHERE

In adjacent Zhejiang Province, rainfall exceeded 50 millimetres on 6.8 percent of the province’s land on Friday night. The highest reading was 110 millimetres in Cangnan county bordering Fujian.

An expressway from Wenzhou of Zhejiang to Fujian was closed for 12 kilometers, while another from Hangzhou to Anhui Province was cut by landslides.

Power supply to 80 villages was also cut. Nearly 500,000 residents and tourists in danger areas had been evacuated by 9 p.m. and the province has called nearly 30,000 ships back to harbor.

More than 50,000 soldiers were prepared for emergencies in Zhejiang, said the local government. Shanghai was put on high alert and the World Expo venue is being protected around the clock. More than 80 foreign ships were delayed or had their voyages cancelled.

“We are unlikely to resume if the typhoon moves northwestwards,” said the captain of a Japanese cargo ship, which was scheduled to sail for Japan Saturday at noon. In addition, more than 140 flights in Shanghai had been delayed by about 10 p.m..

Anhui issued its first typhoon warning this year, and advised residents to stay indoors. East China’s Shandong province has also warned local governments to take measures beforehand to reduce losses from extreme weather.

Morakot, which means “emerald” in Thai, is the eighth storm to hit China this year. It landed in Hualien of Taiwan at 11:45 p.m. Friday, and left at least six people dead or missing. A further 12 were injured. Morakot also overturned cars and cut power supplies.

 WAVE ALERT LEVEL RAISED

The urban area of Linbian Township in Pingtung County of southeast China's Taiwan, is flooded Aug. 8, 2009, because of heavy rainfall brought by typhoon "Morakot". (Xinhua/Wu Ching-teng)

The urban area of Linbian Township in Pingtung County of southeast China’s Taiwan, is flooded Aug. 8, 2009, because of heavy rainfall brought by typhoon “Morakot”. (Xinhua/Wu Ching-teng)

On Saturday afternoon, the National Marine Environmental Forecasting Center upgraded its alert level for both stormy tide and sea wave from “orange” to “red”, the highest level.

The center said as a result of Typhoon Morakot, the stormy tide along the coast of Zhejiang Province and northern part of Fujian Province would be 0.5 meters to 1.8 meters high until Sunday afternoon.

The sea in southern part of the East China Sea and Taiwan Strait will be very rough, with monster waves as high as eight meters, the center warned.

Other coastal areas from Shanghai to Guangdong Province will all experience abnormally high waves, from 2.5 meters to six meters high, it said.

China adopts a four-grade warning system for stormy tide, tsunami, sea ice and sea wave, which uses four colors (red, orange, yellow and blue) to indicate different levels of emergency.

China floods trigger landslide, bridge collapse; dozens remain missing
By: www.photoblog.nbcnews.com 10 Jul 2013 8:12am, EDT

Floodwaters sweeping through Beichuan in southwest China's Sichuan province on July 9, 2013. Rainstorms sweeping across parts of China have affected millions, causing landslides and disabling transportation in Sichuan and Yunnan provinces, state media reported.

Floodwaters sweeping through Beichuan in southwest China’s Sichuan province on July 9, 2013. Rainstorms sweeping across parts of China have affected millions, causing landslides and disabling transportation in Sichuan and Yunnan provinces, state media reported.

Flooding in western China, the worst in 50 years for some areas, triggered a landslide that buried up to 40 people Wednesday. Rescue workers with search dogs rushed to the site in the city of Dujiangyan, in Sichuan province, the official Xinhua News Agency said.

 On Tuesday, the flooding caused the collapse of an almost 50-year-old bridge in a nearby county, sending six vehicles into the raging waters and leaving 12 people missing.

Residents are transported on an excavator as others walk through flooded streets in a district of Chengdu on July 9, 2013.

Residents are transported on an excavator as others walk through flooded streets in a district of Chengdu on July 9, 2013.

Floodwaters sweeping through Beichuan on July 9, 2013.

Floodwaters sweeping through Beichuan on July 9, 2013.

 

REFERENCE: http://photoblog.nbcnews.com/_news/2013/07/10/19392951-china-floods-trigger-landslide-bridge-collapse-dozens-remain-missing

Reference:  http://news.xinhuanet.com/english/2009-08/09/content_11849894.htm

Reference: http://www.theguardian.com/world/2009/aug/09/china-typhoon-morakot

 

 

 

 

 

 

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s